Book Review: Small Gods by Terry Pratchett

March 30, 2018 Blog, Terry Pratchett 2

Book Review: Small Gods by Terry PratchettSmall Gods (Discworld, #13) by Terry Pratchett
Series: Discworld #13
Published by Corgi, HarperCollins on August 1st 2005
Narrator: Nigel Planar
Genres: Fantasy, Fiction, General
Pages: 400
Source: Purchase
Goodreads
One StarOne StarOne Star

Just because you can't explain it, doesn't mean it's a miracle.' Religion is a controversial business in the Discworld. Everyone has their own opinion, and indeed their own gods. Who come in all shapes and sizes. In such a competitive environment, there is a pressing need to make one's presence felt. And it's certainly not remotely helpful to be reduced to be appearing in the form of a tortoise, a manifestation far below god-like status in anyone's book. In such instances, you need an acolyte, and fast. Preferably one who won't ask too many questions...

Reading Challenges: Author Love, British Books Challenge, Terry Pratchett - Discworld

 

This isn’t the first time I’ve read Small Gods, but it is one of the few Discworld books that doesn’t quite fit why I love Terry Pratchett and his Discworld.

I do like his take on religion on the Discworld, and how the Gods (and there are many) need man’s approval to be able to grow. Here we meet one little guy that is in the form of a turtle. He’s supposed to be a great, all knowing, all seeing God, and yet, he’s just a turtle. It is because of man’s belief, or lack thereof, that made him this way.

Of course, when Brutha meets Om, he thinks he is some kind of demon sent to trick him and dissuade him from believing in the one, true Om. Even more interesting is the fact that Brutha can remember absolutely everything. Still, he is a humble servant albeit a bit naive. Om on multiple occasions swears (I believe to himself even) for winding up with Brutha. But it’s a good match!

The villain is very easy to spot as he is outrageous even while he is saying he is a practitioner of Om and Om’s ways. He does things his own way. It is very reminiscent of Pyramids in the way these two work against each other.

‘Vorbis could humble himself in prayer in a way that made the posturings of power-mad emperors look subservient.’

Although not my favorite, there are some moments in this. Not only that made me laugh, but really make me think. It’s not a book that I read every year, but it does fit nicely into the Discworld series. There are not many other characters, just a few make a cameo or two, so it is mostly a stand alone, and as such can be read separated from the rest of the series.

Maybe it’s due to its darkness, or that religion is not my favorite topic, but it is a good book, just not one of my favorites.

 

Favorite quote:

The trouble with being a god is that you’ve got no one to pray to.

Rating Report
Plot
3 / 5
Character Development
3 / 5
Writing Style
3.5 / 5
Personal enjoyment
2 / 5
Cover
5 / 5
Overall: 3.3 / 5

 

When reading a series, do you prefer the books stay in line with each book, or do you like it when they venture off into another area and introduce you to new characters?

About Terry Pratchett

Sir Terry Pratchett sold his first story when he was thirteen, which earned him enough money to buy a second-hand typewriter. His first novel, a humorous fantasy entitled The Carpet People, appeared in 1971 from the publisher Colin Smythe. Terry worked for many years as a journalist and press officer, writing in his spare time and publishing a number of novels, including his first Discworld novel, The Color of Magic, in 1983. In 1987 he turned to writing full time, and has not looked back since. To date there are a total of 39 books in the Discworld series, of which four (so far) are written for children. The first of these, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents, won the Carnegie Medal. A non-Discworld book, Good Omens, his 1990 collaboration with Neil Gaiman, has been a longtime bestseller, and was reissued in hardcover by William Morrow in early 2006 (it is also available as a mass market paperback (Harper Torch, 2006) and trade paperback (Harper Paperbacks, 2006). In 2008, Harper Children's published Terry's standalone non-Discworld YA novel, Nation. Terry's latest book, Snuff, was published in October 2011.

Regarded as one of the most significant contemporary English-language satirists, Pratchett has won numerous literary awards, was named an Officer of the British Empire “for services to literature” in 1998, and has received four honorary doctorates from the Universities of Warwick, Portsmouth, Bath, and Bristol. His acclaimed novels have sold more than 45 million copies (give or take a few) and have been translated into 33 languages.

In Dec. of 2007, Pratchett admitted to being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. On 18 Feb, 2009, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II.

He was awarded the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award in 2010.

 

 

 

One StarOne StarOne Star

Reading this book contributed to these challenges:

2 Responses to “Book Review: Small Gods by Terry Pratchett”

    • Christina

      They’ve changed the covers a few times. I’m not sure if that was the publisher or if Terry Pratchett had anything to do with it, but it makes it hard for collectors! We have so many different covers, it’s ridiculous. Gotta roll with it, I guess.

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Book Review: by Terry Pratchett

March 28, 2018 Blog, Terry Pratchett 0

Small Gods (Discworld, #13) by Terry Pratchett
Series: Discworld #13
Published by Corgi, HarperCollins on August 1st 2005
Narrator: Nigel Planar
Genres: Fantasy, Fiction, General
Pages: 400
Source: Purchase
Goodreads
One StarOne StarOne Star

Just because you can't explain it, doesn't mean it's a miracle.' Religion is a controversial business in the Discworld. Everyone has their own opinion, and indeed their own gods. Who come in all shapes and sizes. In such a competitive environment, there is a pressing need to make one's presence felt. And it's certainly not remotely helpful to be reduced to be appearing in the form of a tortoise, a manifestation far below god-like status in anyone's book. In such instances, you need an acolyte, and fast. Preferably one who won't ask too many questions...

Reading Challenges: Author Love, British Books Challenge, Terry Pratchett - Discworld

 

This isn’t the first time I’ve read Small Gods, but it is one of the few Discworld books that doesn’t quite fit why I love Terry Pratchett and his Discworld.

ot one of my favorites.

 

Favorite quote:

The trouble with being a god is that you’ve got no one to pray to.

Rating Report
Plot
3 / 5
Character Development
3 / 5
Writing Style
3.5 / 5
Personal enjoyment
2 / 5
Cover
5 / 5
Overall: 3.3 / 5

 

When reading a series, do you prefer the books stay in line with each book, or do you like it when they venture off into another area and introduce you to new characters?

About Terry Pratchett

Sir Terry Pratchett sold his first story when he was thirteen, which earned him enough money to buy a second-hand typewriter. His first novel, a humorous fantasy entitled The Carpet People, appeared in 1971 from the publisher Colin Smythe. Terry worked for many years as a journalist and press officer, writing in his spare time and publishing a number of novels, including his first Discworld novel, The Color of Magic, in 1983. In 1987 he turned to writing full time, and has not looked back since. To date there are a total of 39 books in the Discworld series, of which four (so far) are written for children. The first of these, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents, won the Carnegie Medal. A non-Discworld book, Good Omens, his 1990 collaboration with Neil Gaiman, has been a longtime bestseller, and was reissued in hardcover by William Morrow in early 2006 (it is also available as a mass market paperback (Harper Torch, 2006) and trade paperback (Harper Paperbacks, 2006). In 2008, Harper Children's published Terry's standalone non-Discworld YA novel, Nation. Terry's latest book, Snuff, was published in October 2011.

Regarded as one of the most significant contemporary English-language satirists, Pratchett has won numerous literary awards, was named an Officer of the British Empire “for services to literature” in 1998, and has received four honorary doctorates from the Universities of Warwick, Portsmouth, Bath, and Bristol. His acclaimed novels have sold more than 45 million copies (give or take a few) and have been translated into 33 languages.

In Dec. of 2007, Pratchett admitted to being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. On 18 Feb, 2009, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II.

He was awarded the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award in 2010.

 

 

 

One StarOne StarOne Star

Reading this book contributed to these challenges:

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